"1925-1964"
Julien Audebert’s merging of historical stills (in this case, of revolutions on film) at the Frieze Art Fair
Copyright Julien Audebert

"1925-1964"

Julien Audebert’s merging of historical stills (in this case, of revolutions on film) at the Frieze Art Fair

Copyright Julien Audebert




New York City Jay Thornton, flickr.com

New York City
Jay Thornton, flickr.com



From the Dancing with Che series

Copyright Barbara Astman



Top photo: “Girders with Walkway,” 1935-1940 by Ralston Crawford

Bottom photogram: New Abstraction #71, 2000, by James Welling

At the Getty. More here.



"Wassileh and Zbedeh, Ghawagea" (1852)
Copyright Ernest Benecke

"Wassileh and Zbedeh, Ghawagea" (1852)

Copyright Ernest Benecke



firsttimeuser:

Children bathing, 1947 by Charles “Teenie” Harris

firsttimeuser:

Children bathing, 1947 by Charles “Teenie” Harris



"Huddersfield Carnival, August 1987"
Copyright Tim Smith

"Huddersfield Carnival, August 1987"

Copyright Tim Smith



Aboidun Olaku’s landscapes of Nigeria

Aboidun Olaku’s landscapes of Nigeria



Wish I could see the Robert Heinecken show that’s just gone up at MoMA. Here’s how he made this piece, “The S.S. Copyright Project: “On Photography.” (1978)
MoMA: The image on the left is comprised of photographs of Sontag’s text, and that on the right, of random pictures taken around Heinecken’s studio.
Dan Cameron just saw the exhibit and here’s what he said: “I guess his absence, now semi-corrected, illustrates that adage that for too long, art made in NYC was considered American Art, while art made in LA or SF was deemed West Coast Art.”

Wish I could see the Robert Heinecken show that’s just gone up at MoMA. Here’s how he made this piece, “The S.S. Copyright Project: “On Photography.” (1978)

MoMA: The image on the left is comprised of photographs of Sontag’s text, and that on the right, of random pictures taken around Heinecken’s studio.

Dan Cameron just saw the exhibit and here’s what he said: “I guess his absence, now semi-corrected, illustrates that adage that for too long, art made in NYC was considered American Art, while art made in LA or SF was deemed West Coast Art.”



As the world has slowly woken up to the genius of W.G. Sebald’s project there’s been an explosion of critical interest in his work, and the use of photographs in his work. I’ve read most of it and all I’ll say is that I’d much rather watch Max talk about it himself. Thank goodness for the existence of this very short clip, found and yanked out of the stream of history just like Sebald’s photos.



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